Irish Pub Song Of The Day: Leaving Of Liverpool – Frailing Banjo Lesson

The Irish Pub Song Of The Day is a frailing banjo lesson for The Leaving Of Liverpool. This is one of my favorite songs. It’s sounds so old and traditional, but wasn’t written until the 1960′s. It’s just three chords, but so much fun.

The Leaving Of Liverpool MP3

The Leaving Of Liverpool(PDF)

The Leaving Of Liverpool

[G]Farewell to you my [C]own true [G]love,
I am going far,far a[D7]way,
I am [G]bound for Cali[C]forni[G]a,
And I know that I’ll re[D7]turn some [G]day.
[Chorus]
So [D]fare thee well my [C]own true [G]love,
When I return united we will [D7]be,
Its not the [G]leaving of Liverpool that [C]grieves [G]me,
But my darling when I [D7]think of [G]thee.

I have slipped on board a Yankee ship
Davey Crockett is her name,
And her captain it is Burgees,
And they say that she’s a floating hell.

I have sailed with Burgess once before,
And I think I know him well,
If a man’s a salor he will get along,
If not then he’s sure for hell.

Oh the sun is in the harbour love,
And I wish I could remain,
For I know it will be a long,long time,
Before I see you again.

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Look At The Coffin: Frailing Banjo Lesson

The Irish Pub Song Of The Day this time around is a great song: Look At The Coffin. Remember when trying to figure out the melody on frailing banjo, there are only four strings. There are a very limited number of fingerings that I use in showing the simple melody. Pick a certain part that is holding you up and experiment.

Look At The Coffin

Look At The Coffin(PDF)

Look At The Coffin

[G]Look at the coffin, with golden [C]handles
Isn’t it [G]grand, boys, to be bloody well[D7] dead?

[Chorus]
[G]Let’s not have a sniffle, let’s have a [C]bloody good [G]cry
And always re[C]member, the [G]longer you live
The [D]sooner you’ll bloody well [G]die.

Look at the flowers, all bloody withered
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody well dead?

Look at the mourners, bloody great hypocrites..
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody well dead?

Look at the preacher, bloody well sanctified…
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody well dead?

Look at the widow, bloody great female…
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody well dead?

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Gypsy Rover: Frailing Banjo Lesson

It’s time for the way back machine and re-visit Gypsy Rover on frailing banjo. I love this song and unfortunately, it make the cut on our latest CD. We just ran out of room and couldn’t fit it in. What that tells me is that it’s almost time for another CD!

Playing Gypsy Rover on frailing banjo is not very difficult. The melody notes are all on the first four frets and if you lift a finger or move a finger from one string to another you’ve got it.

Gypsy Rover (PDF)

Gypsy Rover MP3

THE GYPSY ROVER

The [G]gypsy [D7]rover came [G]over the [D7]hill

[G]Down through the [C]valley so [G]sha[D7]dy,

He [G]whistled and he [D7]sang till the [G]greenwoods [Em]rang,

And [G]he won the [C]heart of a [G]l[D7]a[G]dy.

Chorus:

Ah-de-do, ah-de-do-da-day,

Ah-de-do, ah-de-da-ay

He whistled and he sang ’til the greenwoods rang,

And he won the heart of a lady.

She left her father’s castle gates
She left her own fine lover
She left her servants and her state
To follow the gypsy rover.

Her father saddled up his fastest steed
And roamed the valleys all over
Sought his daughter at great speed
And the whistling gypsy rover.

He came at last to a mansion fine,
Down by the river Claydee
And there was music and there was wine,
For the gypsy and his lady.

“He is no gypsy, my father” she said
“But lord of these lands all over,
And I shall stay ’til my dying day
With my whistling gypsy rover.”

Irish Rover – Frailing Banjo Lesson for Irish Pub Song Of The Day

I finally think that I have my schedule under control so let’s get back to making some video lessons. This time around the Irish Pub Song Of The Day is a frailing banjo lesson of Irish Rover. I usually do this song in A which I do by capoing the banjo at the 2nd fret. To try to keep the confusion to a minimum, I played the song in the key of G.

It’s a fun song and I love playing it because of the fun runs on the first string. Have fun with it!

Irish Rover MP3

Irish Rover (PDF)

THE IRISH ROVER

[G]In the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and [C]six

We set [G]sail from the sweet cove of [D7]Cork

We were [G]sailing away with a cargo of [C]bricks

For the [G]grand city [D7]hall in New [G]York

‘Twas an elegant craft, she was [D7]rigged fore and aft

And [G]how the trade winds [D7]drove her

She had [G]23 masts and she stood several [C]blasts

And we [G]called her the [D7]Irish [G]Rover

There was Barney McGee from the banks of the Lee
There was Hogan from County Tyrone
There was Johnny McGuirk who was scared stiff of work
And a chap from Westmeath called Malone
There was Slugger O’Toole who was drunk as a rule
And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover
There was your man Mick McMann from the banks of the Bann
Was the skipper of the Irish Rover

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags
We had two million barrels of stones
We had three million bales of old nanny goats tails
We had four million barrels of bone
We had five million hogs, six million dogs
Seven million barrels of porter
We had eight million sides of old blind horses hides
In the hold of the Irish Rover

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out
And our ship lost it’s way in the fog
Then the whole of the crew was reduced down to two
Just myself and the captain’s old dog
The ship struck a rock, Lord what a shock
And nearly tumbled over
Turned nine times around and the poor old dog was drowned
I’m the last of the Irish Rover

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – We Willie: Frailing Banjo Lesson

Finally! I’m back and because Amber finally listened to the words after all of these years of me playing this song and started laughing, I had to do it!

We Willie is a fun song and all you have to remember is that Marleys are Marbles! Have fun with it!

We Willie (PDF)

We Willie MP3

WEE WILLIE

C
Wee Willie’s lost his marley*,
         G
wee Willie’s lost his marley,
          C                            F
Wee Willie’s lost his marley,
C                        G                   C
down by the Springfield Road.*

It rolled right down a gratin’,*
It rolled right down a gratin’,
It rolled right down a gratin’,
down by the Springfield Road.

We Willie got a big stick
We Willie got a big stick
We Willie got a big stick
down by the Springfield Road.

And he shoved it down the gratin’,
he shoved it down the gratin’,
He shoved it down the gratin’,
down by the Springfield Road.

But he didn’t get his marley,
he didn’t get his marley,
He didn’t get his marley,
down by the Springfield Road.

We Wille got some dynamite,
We Wille got some dynamite,
We Wille got some dynamite,
And he blew up the Springfield Road

Wee Willie’s found his marley
Wee Willie’s found his marley’
Wee Willie’s found his marley
down by the Springfield Road.

It was in his bloody pocket
It was in his bloody pocket
It was in this bloody pocket
down by the Springfield Road.

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Maid Of Fife: Frailing Banjo Lesson

This is a great song that I loved ever since listening to The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem. I always liked to play it in the key of D, but I thought that I would be nice to everyone and play it in the key of G. You can find the tab for this song in the Keys of C, D and G in Irish Pub Songs For The 5-String Banjo, Volume 1 in print form or as a pdf download.

Maid Of Fife MP3

Maid Of Fife(PDF)

MAID OF FIFE

There [G]once was a troop of Irish Dragoons, Come marching down through [D7]Fife-e-o

And the [G]captain fell in love with a [C]very bonny lass

And her [G]name it was called pretty [C]Pe[D7]ggy-[G]o

There’s many a bonny lass in the town of Augherlass
There’s many a bonny lassie in the Jeery-o
There’s many a bonny Jean in the streets of Aberdeen
But the flower of them all is in Fife-e-o

“Oh, come down the stairs pretty Peggy my dear,
Oh, come down the stairs pretty Peggy-o
Oh, come down the stairs, comb back your yellow hair
Bid a long farewell to your mammy-o”

The colonel he cried “mount, mount boys mount”, The captain he cried “tarry-o
Oh tarry for a while, for another day or twa’, ‘till I see if this bonny lass will marry-o”

“I never did intend a soldier’s lady for to be, I never will marry a soldier-o
I never did intend to gang to a foreign land, and I never will marry a soldier-o”

Long ‘ere we came to the town of Augerlass, We had our captain to carry-o
And long ‘ere we reached the streets of Aberdeen, We had our captain to bury-o

Green grow the birks on bonny Eithan side, and low lie the lowlands of Fife-e-o
Oh, the captain’s name was Ned and he died for a maid
He died for the chambermaid of Fife-e-o

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – The Winds Are Singing Freedom: Frailing Banjo Lesson

I survived a very, very fun and festive St. Patrick’s Day season and actually was able to record a lesson!

The Winds Are Singing Freedom is a fun song on frailing banjo. This was a favorite this weekend so I decided to revisit it from a couple of years ago. Have fun with it!

THE WINDS ARE SINGING FREEDOM

THE WINDS ARE SINGING FREEDOM(PDF)

THE WINDS ARE SINGING FREEDOM

In the [G]battered [D7]streets of [G]Belfast can’t you hear the [D7]people [G]cry?

For [C]justice [D7]long [G]denied [Em]them and their [C]crying [Am]fills the [D7]sky

But the [G]winds of [D7]change are [G]singing bringing hope from [D7]dark des[G]pair

There’s a [C]day of [D7]justice [G]com[Em]ing you can [C]feel it [D7]in the [G]air

And the winds are singing freedom they sing it everywhere
They sing it on the mountainside and in the city square
They sing of a new day dawning when our people will be free
Come and join their song of freedom let it ring from sea to sea

Too long our people suffered in their misery and their tears
And foreign rulers used our land for about eight hundred years
It’s a long road has no turning and I know that soon we’ll see
That day of justice dawning when our people will be free

There’s a time laid out for laughing there’s a time laid out to weep
There’s a time laid out for sowing and a time laid out to reap
There’s a time to love your brother there’s a time for hate to cease
You must sow the seeds of justice to reap the fruits of peace

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Frailing Banjo Lesson: Peace and Justice

I am finally back! I can’t really walk, but at least I could sit in the barstool and play this song!

Peace and Justice is a great, great song and I hope you like it as much as I do. Just remember that all you need to know how to do is change a couple of chords, the basic frailing strum and some single note strikes.

Peace and Justice

Peace and Justice(PDF)

 

PEACE AND JUSTICE

Raise the [G]cry for peace and justice, let the [D7]people sound the [G]call
Justice [C]for our battered [G]country. Peace for [D7]one and peace for [G]all

Chorus:

Peace and [G]justice are our watchwords. Peace and [D7]justice is our [G]call
Peace and [C]justice for our [G]people. Peace for [D7]one and peace for [G]all

Tell the RUC and the English soldiers, the UVF and the IRA
Guns can’t silence all the people calling out for peace to light another brand new day

In Armagh, Belfast and Derry, people walking hand in hand
Cry with love and heartfelt yearning, “Help us heal our broken land”

Man’s injustice to his neighbour, for too long has been our fate
Practice love and understanding, all we need to hate is hate

Though the road be rough and rocky and the problems mountain high
Hold your hand out to your neighbour
And we’ll all find peace and justice by and by

We must all sit down together share our hopes, our joys, our fears
Understanding and forgiveness will dry up our country’s tears

Every day that peace continues, hope will help to ease the pain
Sisters, brothers understanding will make our land a nation once again

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Red Is The Rose: Frailing Banjo Lesson

I love this song and I sang it low for my wife Sandy. She loves when I sing the lower octave. I usually don’t do it for the videos and I had fun with it. The Irish Pub Song Of The Day is Red Is The Rose on frailing / clawhammer banjo.

Red Is The Rose MP3

Red Is The Rose(PDF)

Red Is The Rose

Come [G]over the [Em]hills, my [Am]bonny Irish [C]lass

Come [G]over the [Em]hills to your [G]dar[D7]ling;

[C]You choose the [G]rose, love, and I’ll [Am]make the [C]vow

And [G]I’ll be your [C]true [G]love for[D7]ev[G]er.

Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
And fair is the lily of the valley;
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne
But my love is fairer than any.

‘Twas down by Killarney’s green woods that we strayed
And the moon and the stars they were shining;
The moon shone its rays on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she’d be my love forever.

It’s not for the parting tht my sister pains
It’s not for the grief of my mother,
“Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever.

Irish Pub Song Of The Day – Frailing Banjo Lesson: Dirty Old Town in 3 Keys

I had a lot of requests for this song, so I did it in the keys of G, C and D. So here is Dirty Old Town on frailing / clawhammer banjo.

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